Tea Towel Tutorial

I wanted to have a little gift for a couple whose engagement party we were attending, and tea towels were the first thing to come to mind. Tea towels spruce up any kitchen and are a nice way to use up fabric from the stash.

Finished Size: 16″ x 24″ ***As you will see the size of the towel is adjustable. If you have a favorite tea towel, measure that one and add the seam allowances to the measurements. Or if you have a FQ (18″ x 22″) than you can use that after squaring it up, but it’ll be a bit shorter in length.

 

Materials for Two Tea Towels

  • 1/2 yard of fabric or two fat quarters (the length of these towels will be shorter)
  • machine or hand sewing supplies
  • ruler
  • rotary cutter and/or scissors
  • pins
  • iron
  • thread (I use Auriful)
  • embroidery floss (I use DMC)
  • embroidery needle

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Here is the Costco bought towel I based my tea towel on.

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First I measured this towel to find the dimensions.

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I added a 1/2″ seam allowance on each length and an 1″ on the width. ***Use these seam allowances if you’re using a fat quarter or a custom size.

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  1. After pressing the fabric cut 2) 26″ x 17″ pieces.
  2. On each length side, turn and press a 1/4″ of fabric. Repeat this step twice for each cut piece of fabric.

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3. Now that each side of the length is folded over 1/4″ twice, pin each side in place.

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4. Sew 1/8″ away from the edge on both lengths. I’m using a 2mm stitch length here.

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5. Sew 1/4″ away from the edge of both lengths, creating a parallel line to the first.  Now the lengths should be completely sewn.

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6. Turn to the width edges. Press and fold each width edge 1/2″, and then fold and press it 1/2″ again, pinning the edge to hold it in place until sewing. Repeat this on the other width.

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7. Sew 1/8″ in from the edge on both widths.

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8. Sew a 1/4″ from the edge on both widths.

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9. Trim up any loose threads. Admire your tea towels!

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10. This is a prefect item to embellish. I went for a little spot in each of the bottom right corners. You might want to put your initials or maybe an important date.

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Thanks for stopping by! Hope you make some awesome towels.

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Creating Creation

Exciting things have been happening and that energy spawned a new quilt design. Here is sample number one.

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The idea for this quilt top happened after I’d cut out triangles from fat quarters, sewed those in to hexagons, and looked at the results. The results are a blend of the past and the present. While I was sewing it up my grandma filtered through my thoughts, and this is a quilt inspired by her.

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Cut out triangles for sample quilt top two.

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My supervisor stopped in to make sure all arranging was up to snuff.

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Problem solving looks classic here.

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What have you been making?

Colorful Quilt Top

This quilt is an amalgamation of cloth, time, patterns, and my brain. I started making this quilt for a class using The Rabbit Factory’s Homespun Hill. The pieced blocks were fun and quick to put together. The color palette is dewy grass.

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I modified this quilt top by adding Carolyn Friedlander‘s Creativebug Polk block.  I’ve done some paper-piecing, and found this exercise to be helpful and inspiring. Paper-piecing is a great stash buster. Creativebug provides excellent instructions, visually and in print format (I’m big a fan!).

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The quilt top has batiks, prints, solids, and paper-pieced blocks. The fabric on hand became this quilt; in the past year my taste, knowledge, and understanding of fabric has become more robust, and I’m happy to see some old fabrics being incorporated into a quilt and removed from the stash. Sarah Watts’ Honeymoon made it in and some batiks my auntie gifted to me. I’m partial to Sarah Watts round lines.

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Honestly, sitting close to this quilt top since April, I don’t know if I’m ready to look at it as a whole. And really, it isn’t complete, because I have to add quilting, backing, and binding. Overall, I like the movement and the quilt top.

What did you make over the weekend?

 

Scraps Tote

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This tote first started coming together in April, but was set aside for other projects. It caught my eye the other day. I scoped out the previous work, and found I was at the final steps of construction. The instructions are from The School of Sewing.

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Free motion quilting is the best, and I love working on improving my skills.

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Most of the scraps came from a baby quilt I finished in March.

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The fabric scraps are mostly from Lizzy House’s line Natural History. A great line with playful fabrics that I love.

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What have you been working on? Thanks for stopping by.

Applique Strips Basted

Basting after pinning applique pieces is one of my favorite parts of the craft and I like that the turned edges seem smoother when compared with my turning-on-the-line only applique. Basting may seem like it’ll away time from stitching, but trust me, it doesn’t, and I don’t worry about being stuck with needles. I love all parts of needle-turn applique.

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Pattern Name & Author: Aerial Grove & Carolyn Friedlander

Right before I started this I stopped myself from working on a needle-turn applique project I wasn’t enjoying. The project and I did not mesh creatively and when I realized this it was an easy decision to move on. Now I’m stitching away happily.

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I recently (today) had guests, and one was my sewing auntie; she helped applique one strip and I’m finishing up the second. When I first saw this quilt pattern I was excited to start working on it. The pattern is fun, graceful, and lends itself to great amounts of color play.

Have any projects you’ve moved on from?