Easy Pillow Covers

A few months ago a cousin and I made a trip to the fabric store and then by the Goodwill for some pillows. The Goodwill has great deals on pillows, especially for pillows that will receive a lot of good use. I referenced the blog Hey There, Home’s post on How to Make an Envelope Pillow Cover.  I really enjoyed the clear instructions shown on Hey There, Home. My method was basically the same.

Here are the pillows pre-covering.

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After measuring each pillow, I cut the fabric with a half inch seam added to the overall size.

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The pinning.

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I marked the corners before sewing and using the serger on the edges.

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A covered pillow!

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A long pillow covered.

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A complete set.

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This has been such an exciting month. A big thank you to all of those backers that helped fund our Kickstarter campaign–the support is stunning and I look forward to the stitching! We’ve been super busy with regular life. We are grateful for our good health.

Sending all our best to everyone!

US Passport Cover Tutorial

Completing this pattern has been an exciting process, but highlighted the challenges of communication. I hope this tutorial/pattern is easy to navigate and helps the user make a passport cover. This is a fun project! The covers make great gifts to your friends that travel or are perfect for making yourself a personalized cover.

Tutorial & PDF: Passport Cover by Brambleton Threads

Materials:
Fabric: scraps or 1 Fat Quarter or 2 Fat Eighth of different colors.
Woven Fusible Interfacing
Thread
Sewing Machine
Rotary Cutter
Self-Healing Mat
Fabric Pen
Scissors
Iron
Spray Starch

  1. Measure and cut
    Shell: 1) 5 3/4” x 11 3/4”
    Lining: 1) 5 3/4” x 11 3/4”
    Fusible Fabric: 1) 5” x 7 1/2”

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2. Using the instructions provided by the manufacturer, iron interfacing to the center of the wrong side of the shell fabric. IMG_5724

 

3. Place right sides of the shell and lining together and pin all sides.IMG_5721

 

4. Using a fabric pen and ruler, mark 1/4” at each corner. Use scissors to clip all corners 1/4”.IMG_5758

 

5. With a 1/4” seam allowance sew three sides, both lengths and one width (two longs & a short), leaving one side open. Backstitch the start and beginnings of each edge.  Set stitches by pressing with hot iron.IMG_5723

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6. Pull the fabric right-side out through the open edge. Press edges.

7. Fold the short-side’s open seam under a 1/4” and press using fingers or iron. Pin.IMG_5730

 

8. Sew shut the open seam with an 1/8” top-stitch. Set stitches. Trim thread. IMG_5737

 

9. Fold the piece in half and press, creating a crease in the middle. Reopen the piece flat.IMG_5741

 

10. To create the flaps, fold each width in towards the middle crease 1 3/4” and press. Pin in the middle of the creased edge and flap edges. Do this on each side.IMG_5764IMG_5762

 

11. With an 1/8” top-stitch sew the entire length of the top of the piece, backstitching at each corner of the flaps. Repeat this on the bottom edge.IMG_5766

 

12. Set stitches. Trim. Add passport & admire! The fabric will soften with time & travel. IMG_5852IMG_5850

Please share your results and comments! Thanks for stopping by.

Easy Passport Cover

I always travel with a passport, but I never found the perfect case.  I first wrote and made this easy passport pattern last Fall to solve my passport case woes. I’ve made a few demos in the process of pattern writing and I love the final product. Later this week I’ll share the pattern and tutorial!

I was traveling this early part of April and I’m looking forward to catching up with everyone. Thanks for stopping by!

Greeting Card Tutorial: Embroidery!

A thank you to all that have stopped by & looked, liked, commented, or a combination of all three. Deciding to start a blog wasn’t easy for me due to introversion, but that was a feeling I pushed aside to forge ahead.

The way I typically thank those in my life is through a greeting card. With the internet being my platform here, I thought it best to provide a greeting card tutorial. The embroidery greeting card first came in to my life in the form of tiny hearts I cut out. I embroidered my friends’ initials or names in the hearts. Many of the tiny hearts were cut  without a thought about templates and I hadn’t learned back-stitch yet (my favorite right now)! This is the sophisticated version, using calligraphy style script, of those sweet little hearts. The embroidery greeting cards don’t take much time, but make a big impact on the recipients!

Materials:

  • Card-stock or any type of paper you would like to use for a card. Firm is better here.
  • Embroidery Needle
  • Embroidery Thread
  • General Purpose Thread
  • Pencil & Eraser
  • Scissors

1.  Measure the paper to to size of card you would like. Here I cut the paper down to 6 1/2″ x 11″.

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2.  Fold the paper in half hamburger style. I used my fingers to set the crease.

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3.  Free hand draw what you might like on the card. Typically I write “Happy Birthday, _____!”, or if for a couple I draw both their names with a heart in-between. Don’t worry about using fancy script, because everything looks beautiful once embroidered.

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4.  Poke holes in the card every couple of millimeters or centimeters. The closer the holes are the more likely of a collapse of the card-stock between the spaces. The further apart the holes the larger the stitches will be and this will make the card faster to complete. A variety of stitch lengths are used in the making of this tutorial for demonstration.

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5. Pick your colors and embroider! I like to use french knots for periods. The thread may feel bulky and stiff, but this is because paper is a more firm fiber than cloth overall!

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6. I prefer to hide the knots inside the card, but if you are feeling bold you may leave them on the outside of the card.

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7. The corners have to be secured since the card will not close flat on its own. I used general purpose thread to anchor each corner with an X, but you could as easily use embroidery thread. I tied the knots to the back of the card.

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8. Admire & fill out your card to send away. Or you might use the card as a wall hanging for your inspiration board.

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Thank you for reading & I hope everyone has a lovely week. Please feel free to share any made embroidery cards!

Tutorial: Loose Cord Holder

With all the indoors time this week I noticed cords all over the place. The cords took up more than a fair share of the floor space. Cord wraps & holders are nothing new, but I had an idea modification yesterday, sketched it out & whipped up four this morning. IMG_5103.jpg

These cord holders are perfect for cell phone and tablet chargers. For bigger corded items  these holders work great too! My main goal here was to utilize as much scrap material as I could to make something not-yet-useful productive. The buttons are from a collection of odd buttons & I used all fabric scraps. Customization is easy here! To make a longer & wider wrap for a certain product, measure the diameter of the cord when wrapped & double that number. This will give you an almost perfect measure of how long to cut your fabric; make sure to add at least a quarter inch at each end for seam allowance.

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Materials

  • Fabric scraps –enough for 2) 2″ x5″ pieces
  • Sewing Machine or Hand Sewing Supplies
  • Buttons
  • Fabric Marker or pen or chalk
  • Iron
  • Ruler
  • Rotary cutter or scissors

 

  1. Press fabric. Measure fabric & cut 2) 2″ x”5″ pieces.
  2. Place Right Sides together & pin fabric. IMG_5023.jpg
  3. Using 1/4″ clip each corner.IMG_5027IMG_5030.jpg
  4. Sew with a 1/4″ seam (or 1/4″ foot) the top & two side edges back-stitching at each end. Press to set stitches.IMG_5031.jpg
  5. Turn inside out, gently, with finger & knitting needle or chopstick. Press. Admire! IMG_5062.jpgIMG_5063.jpg
  6. Tuck in top edge & top stitch about an 1/8″ from the edge. IMG_5064.jpg
  7. Mark the button hole along the top edge & sew. If making two button holes, mark the top buttonhole first & then measure to add a second. This helps make sure fabric shrinkage doesn’t affect buttonhole placement. This may not be something you experience on your machine, but I like to be careful! When marking button holes, I went between 1/2″-3/4″ for the top button hole & around & 1″ to 1 1/4″ for the second button hole. IMG_5073.jpgIMG_5078.jpgIMG_5068.jpgIMG_5079.jpg
  8. Mark button position on fabric. Again, place the top button first. When placing the second button make sure the cuff is buttoned & then find the middle, marking it with a fabric pen. Sew on all buttons.IMG_5085.jpgIMG_5082.jpgIMG_5083.jpgIMG_5086.jpg
  9. Sit back & enjoy a less unraveled environment! Please share any pictures of wraps you make & let me know if you have any questions or comments. IMG_5091.jpg

Thank you to everyone that has stopped by, commented & liked this blog. Sewing, in all forms, has been a passion I’ve had for a long time & it is wonderful to share it with any one else that is even a little bit interested. Hope everyone is having a great weekend!  IMG_5107.jpgIMG_5112.jpg

Merino Wool Bump Blankets + Easy Pattern

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There were six merino wool bumps around the house. Now there are no bumps around the house! The bumps are from Bag Smith & are 94% merino wool with 6% nylon (mainly to provide structure for the wool) & each have 125 yards of yarn (it feels like the softest rope). My sister gave me these as an exchange & I love how soft the yarn is to knit with.

IMG_4939.jpgI taught myself to knit about five years ago & have enjoyed it ever since. Knitting on size 50 needles made my hands feel a bit like jellyfish. The needles tap each other & a nice rhythm develops. It was a great reminder to me about making sure I don’t knit too tightly in general. This winter weather has everyone inside & I was kept cozy under the wool being knit!IMG_4965.jpg

To make your own blanket you will need:

  • Two Merino Wool Bumps ( or around 350 yards)
  • Size US 50 (25 mm) needles
  • Scissors
  • Finished size: 45″ x 45″
  • Gauge: 1 stitch/inch
  1. Cast on 34 stitches
  2. Purl next row (WS)
  3. Knit next row (RS)
  4. Repeat steps 2&3 by purling all WS stitches and knitting all WS stitches.
  5. After purling the 39th row, cast off.

***Of note: While knitting three throws in a row I noticed that the length of yarn in each bump was not the same. All of the bumps had enough yarn to make 39 rows + cast off & bind off. If you have more yarn & would like your blanket to be longer keep knitting, but make sure to leave enough yarn for casting off.

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Greeting Card Tutorial: Upcycling Scraps & Notecards

I needed a card yesterday. The store’s cards were okay & nice, but lacked a personal touch. After assessing materials in house, I decided to use 5″ x 7″ lined notecards & scraps from the just finished half-squre triangle quilt to make a greeting card.

Materials: 

  • Scissors
  • Hand-sewing needle
  • Thread
  • Pins
  • 5″ x 7″ Lined Notecard
  • Fabric scraps
  • Sewing Machine
  • Imagination!

 

Step One: Grab fabric scraps & see what ideas come to mind. What shapes do you like? Cut those shapes out of the fabric!

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Step Two: Pin shapes on a piece of fabric & thread a hand-sewing needle. IMG_4812.jpgIMG_4813.jpg

Step Three: Sew the shape on to the fabric. I used a straight stitch here. IMG_4817IMG_4819

Step Four: Place fabric on the notecard & decide how the card should be folded. I creased the card hamburger style. IMG_4823.jpg

Step Five: Adjust stitch length & sew fabric on to the card. IMG_4827IMG_4826

Step Six: Enjoy & make more! IMG_4838.jpgIMG_4839.jpg

Thanks for reading & hope you enjoy making some cards!