Crib Quilt

This crib size baby quilt is 54″ x 41″ and has a cotton batting. We aren’t sure if our friend’s baby is a boy or a girl, and not knowing that allowed for me to play a lot with color and some prints. I pieced together the top earlier this year, of course using Aurifil thread. The binding are batiks I had left over from another quilt.

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This quilt reminds me of watching the sunrise over the Atlantic ocean, something I’ve been able to enjoy pretty often lately. The quilt backing fabrics are both Cotton + Steel. I love the pink’s lushness.


I used a deep gold thread to machine quilt this. In all spots that looked like a square I made an X and filled in the rest of the quilt with lines. The ocean often has pockets of smooth water on the surface and I thought of those spaces while I was making X’s.


A thank you to my husband for holding up the quilts!


I find machine quilting on cotton batting to be a lot smoother and quicker experience than with wool batting. The fibers in wool are much more like a bramble. Cotton typically settles down with itself. What do you like to use for batting?

Thanks for stopping by!


Tea Towel Tutorial

I wanted to have a little gift for a couple whose engagement party we were attending, and tea towels were the first thing to come to mind. Tea towels spruce up any kitchen and are a nice way to use up fabric from the stash.

Finished Size: 16″ x 24″ ***As you will see the size of the towel is adjustable. If you have a favorite tea towel, measure that one and add the seam allowances to the measurements. Or if you have a FQ (18″ x 22″) than you can use that after squaring it up, but it’ll be a bit shorter in length.


Materials for Two Tea Towels

  • 1/2 yard of fabric or two fat quarters (the length of these towels will be shorter)
  • machine or hand sewing supplies
  • ruler
  • rotary cutter and/or scissors
  • pins
  • iron
  • thread (I use Auriful)
  • embroidery floss (I use DMC)
  • embroidery needle


Here is the Costco bought towel I based my tea towel on.


First I measured this towel to find the dimensions.


I added a 1/2″ seam allowance on each length and an 1″ on the width. ***Use these seam allowances if you’re using a fat quarter or a custom size.


  1. After pressing the fabric cut 2) 26″ x 17″ pieces.
  2. On each length side, turn and press a 1/4″ of fabric. Repeat this step twice for each cut piece of fabric.


3. Now that each side of the length is folded over 1/4″ twice, pin each side in place.


4. Sew 1/8″ away from the edge on both lengths. I’m using a 2mm stitch length here.


5. Sew 1/4″ away from the edge of both lengths, creating a parallel line to the first.  Now the lengths should be completely sewn.


6. Turn to the width edges. Press and fold each width edge 1/2″, and then fold and press it 1/2″ again, pinning the edge to hold it in place until sewing. Repeat this on the other width.


7. Sew 1/8″ in from the edge on both widths.


8. Sew a 1/4″ from the edge on both widths.


9. Trim up any loose threads. Admire your tea towels!


10. This is a prefect item to embellish. I went for a little spot in each of the bottom right corners. You might want to put your initials or maybe an important date.



Thanks for stopping by! Hope you make some awesome towels.

Sun Embroidered

2016, like all years, has been incredible. This embroidered piece is influenced by the many sunrises I caught this year; waking up in the dawn’s dark is one of my favorite activities.




After the embroidery was finished, I machine quilted the double wool batting with gold Gutermann thread.



The front up close.




The blue behind.


Thanks for stopping by at any point during this year and after!

A Quilted Bag

Machine quilting is one of my favorite activities because I love the way quilted lines texture the fabric. This quilted bag came in to being for a friend’s birthday gift. It is sturdy and brightly colored. The fabric is a combination of recent acquisitions and old fabrics waiting to be used.


A close up on the handles.


The inside is not quilted. I used the School of Sewing‘s construction, with some personalized touches, such a size and fabrics.



What type of handmade gifts do you like to give?