Rocks in Round

Rain clouds stopped by last week allowing us to trek midday with the pups to Red Rock Canyon. It’s a stunning landscape with much for the eye to catch, making me itch for extra time out there to hike, think and imagine.

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I sat down immediately when home and started stitching this idea. The coloring stitches aren’t finished yet, but the piece is pleasing to the eye already.

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Back stitch and straight stitch are being employed here. The thread is DMC.

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The photography professor I studied with encouraged shooting around 7 AM & PM for interesting lighting. Today I caught shadows.

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Husband!

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How was your weekend? What did you make?

US Passport Cover Tutorial

Completing this pattern has been an exciting process, but highlighted the challenges of communication. I hope this tutorial/pattern is easy to navigate and helps the user make a passport cover. This is a fun project! The covers make great gifts to your friends that travel or are perfect for making yourself a personalized cover.

Tutorial & PDF: Passport Cover by Brambleton Threads

Materials:
Fabric: scraps or 1 Fat Quarter or 2 Fat Eighth of different colors.
Woven Fusible Interfacing
Thread
Sewing Machine
Rotary Cutter
Self-Healing Mat
Fabric Pen
Scissors
Iron
Spray Starch

  1. Measure and cut
    Shell: 1) 5 3/4” x 11 3/4”
    Lining: 1) 5 3/4” x 11 3/4”
    Fusible Fabric: 1) 5” x 7 1/2”

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2. Using the instructions provided by the manufacturer, iron interfacing to the center of the wrong side of the shell fabric. IMG_5724

 

3. Place right sides of the shell and lining together and pin all sides.IMG_5721

 

4. Using a fabric pen and ruler, mark 1/4” at each corner. Use scissors to clip all corners 1/4”.IMG_5758

 

5. With a 1/4” seam allowance sew three sides, both lengths and one width (two longs & a short), leaving one side open. Backstitch the start and beginnings of each edge.  Set stitches by pressing with hot iron.IMG_5723

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6. Pull the fabric right-side out through the open edge. Press edges.

7. Fold the short-side’s open seam under a 1/4” and press using fingers or iron. Pin.IMG_5730

 

8. Sew shut the open seam with an 1/8” top-stitch. Set stitches. Trim thread. IMG_5737

 

9. Fold the piece in half and press, creating a crease in the middle. Reopen the piece flat.IMG_5741

 

10. To create the flaps, fold each width in towards the middle crease 1 3/4” and press. Pin in the middle of the creased edge and flap edges. Do this on each side.IMG_5764IMG_5762

 

11. With an 1/8” top-stitch sew the entire length of the top of the piece, backstitching at each corner of the flaps. Repeat this on the bottom edge.IMG_5766

 

12. Set stitches. Trim. Add passport & admire! The fabric will soften with time & travel. IMG_5852IMG_5850

Please share your results and comments! Thanks for stopping by.

Easy Passport Cover

I always travel with a passport, but I never found the perfect case.  I first wrote and made this easy passport pattern last Fall to solve my passport case woes. I’ve made a few demos in the process of pattern writing and I love the final product. Later this week I’ll share the pattern and tutorial!

I was traveling this early part of April and I’m looking forward to catching up with everyone. Thanks for stopping by!

Design-in-Progress: Applique Pattern

This pattern, Eggbert, came to me while I waited for students to filter in for conferences. Thirty seconds downtime doesn’t allow much room for my critical brain to inhibit the creative part and suddenly I had eggs drawn on the paper.

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This isn’t surprising. As a child I was prone to carrying an egg around. I love eggs. They have such strength and weight. They move internally. They are food. They are life. They come in many colors. They can be dyed and covered in hot wax, or hollowed, stuffed with confetti, and pasted over again for a spring burst.

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I thought this would be a great time to share the applique preview. After transferring the refined version over to paper, and then to wax paper, I started to think about fabric. I hunted around in the stash and, of course, found some of my favorite grey background fabric! Batiks are a great choice here, because the fabric is nicely woven and the patterns create playful movement. The final design isn’t completely ready to be revealed, but will be available on PDF soon!

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Eggbert is a great shape for those just beginning to applique and want to practice. I love these little eggs and I look forward to sharing the finished products soon.

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